Practice a client interview

In class, we brainstormed several variables necessary to know prior to creating an appropriate CV prescription for your client.

List several variables you think are important on the worksheet provided and make note of your client’s response. Consider why these factors may influence the CV program you prescribe your client.

Review and practice the Lunge and Squat exercises

Familiarize yourself with various LUNGE and SQUAT  exercises (with and without instability), experience the exercises, and recognize when you would coach these exercises (with whom and when in training).

Lunge Exercises:

The lunge movement pattern provides the foundation for walking, running, and climbing. Being a unilateral movement, it provides an excellent way to recognize imbalances in strength and mobility. Both hips contribute to controlled deceleration (eccentric) and acceleration (concentric) phases.

General form and cue reminders:

  • maintain an active plank
  • maintain a tall torso throughout the movement
  • level pelvis
  • near vertical shin angle
Squat Exercises:

Vertical moving plank – with maximal knee flexion.

General form and cue reminders:

  • maintain core stability
  • maintain neutral posture
  • keep torso tall
  • keep feet rooted into the ground
  • hips will open at the bottom (no valgus collapse)
  • on the return, the hips and shoulders move together.

After reviewing and practising these exercises, mark this task as complete, and move to the final task of completing a full (Hinge or Rotate) Peer Review (full rubric).

Review and practice the TRX Hinge and TRX Power Pull exercises

Review the set-up and coaching cues for two of the exercises we learned last week.

TRX Hinge:

General form and cue reminders:

  • stiff neutral spine
  • level pelvis
  • maximal hip flexion-extension
  • minimal knee flexion-extension
  • near vertical shin angle
  • Review the TRX Plank exercise here: TRX Hinge
TRX Power Pull:

Rotational strength is trained for striking power. These exercises involve core stability with hip mobility. As with all exercise done to increase power, these exercises are done in an unstable environment.

General form and cue reminders:

  • maintain core stability
  • maintain neutral posture
  • generate power through the core using mobility in the hips, shoulders, and thoracic spine

After reviewing and practising these exercises, mark this task as complete, and move to the task of experiencing and coaching Lunge and Squat exercises.

Review and practice the Hinge and Rotate exercises

Familiarize yourself with various HINGE and ROTATE  exercises (with and without instability), experience the exercises, and recognize when you would coach these exercises (with whom and when in training).

Hinge Exercises:

General form and cue reminders:

  • stiff neutral spine
  • level pelvis
  • maximal hip flexion-extension
  • minimal knee flexion-extension
  • near vertical shin angle
Rotate Exercises:

Rotational strength is trained for striking power. These exercises involve core stability with hip mobility. As with all exercise done to increase power, these exercises are done in an unstable environment.

General form and cue reminders:

  • maintain core stability
  • maintain neutral posture
  • generate power through the core using mobility in the hips, shoulders, and thoracic spine

After reviewing and practising these exercises, mark this task as complete, and move to the final task of completing a full (Hinge or Rotate) peer review exam practice.

Review and practice the TRX Plank, TRX Chest Press, and TRX Row exercises

Review the set-up and coaching cues for three of the exercises we learned last week.

TRX Plank:

The plank protects the spine by bracing to maintain stability, and resist rotation.

Practising and training to resist rotation help to prevent injury and increase efficiency of movement.

General form and cue reminders:

  • neutral spine
  • level pelvis
  • alignment of the ears, shoulders, hips, knees, and ankles
  • all exercises are held with full body tension and controlled diaphragmatic breathing
  • when performing the plank focus on maintaining tension and stability in the core and enable mobility at the extremities when needed
  • Review the TRX Plank exercise here: TRX Plank
TRX Chest Press:

General form and cue reminders:

  • focus on resisting flexion, extension, and rotation of torso and hips
  • keep the torso, hips, and lower body stability and aligned
  • maintaining tension and stability in the core
  • arms, chest, and shoulder girdle are driving the movement
  • all exercises are held with full body tension and controlled diaphragmatic breathing
TRX Row:

General form and cue reminders:

  • the core should be braced and the torso stable
  • maintain tension and stability in the core
  • the arms and shoulder girdle are mobile
  • initiate the pulling movements with a scapular-J or negative shrug
  • keep the shoulders depressed and retracted
  • all exercises are held with full body tension and controlled diaphragmatic breathing

After practising the three exercises above, find a suitable client in class and practice coaching the TRX Spiderman Pushup exercise. This exercise involves the anti-rotation qualities of the plank and mountain climber with the horizontal push qualities of the pushup.

After reviewing and practising these exercises, mark this task as complete, and move to the final task of experiencing and coaching Hinge and Rotate exercises.

Other Adaptive Push Exercises 2

The following exercises are experiential only.  They will not be used during your practical.  However, they can be used for programming as well as with clients in the future.  Take turns being the client and the trainer and try at least one set of each of the following adaptive core exercises:

1-DB Overhead Triceps Extension

Questions to consider:  Is this functional?  Why not use a shoulder press which trains both deltoid and triceps and is more functional?

Movement Pattern: Single-joint | isolation Target: Triceps Synergist(s):
Exercise
Regressions: Triceps Kickback Progressions: Dips
Key Teaching Points

Seated upright.  Carefully place DB overhead.  Use help of trainer if available.  Secure DB by holding DB handle tightly within overlapping hands.  Start with elbows flexed.  Initiate movement by engaging the triceps as you extend the elbows.  Remain upright.  Careful not to allow the DB to contact the head.  Control the movement back down to the starting position.  Spot at the wrists of the client.

Common Error(s): Inappropriate momentum | Forward Head Posture
Spotting:

2-Band Under Feet Shoulder Lateral Raise

Questions to consider:  Would DBs be better?  Why would you use a band?

Movement Pattern: Single-joint | isolation Target: Deltoid (Medial) Synergist(s):
Exercise
Regressions: Assisted Lateral Shoulder Raise Progressions: Lateral Shoulder Raise
Key Teaching Points
  1. Band secure under arch/groove of midfoot.
  2. Even foot pressure to secure band.
  3. Upright and neutral posture.
  4. Resist bending forward at hips and extending backward to create trunk momentum. Rather, keep spine neutral and core engage and initiate movement via lateral deltoid contraction.
  5. The full range will be slightly above horizontal and pain-free.
Common Error(s): Inappropriate momentum | Forward Head Posture
Spotting: Band/Tubing Anchoring

3-Hands Behind Back Chest Stretch

Questions to consider:  Could they use a dowel?

Movement Pattern: Single-joint | isolation Target: Pec Major Synergist(s): Biceps, Deltoids (Anterior)
Exercise
Regressions: Progressions:
Key Teaching Points

Maintaining an upright and neutral spine/posture clasp your hands behind your back.  Slowly elevate your arms while keeping your hands clasped upwards.  Careful not to allow your head to shift forward.  Consider holding a stretch strap or towel if you cannot reach your hands together.  The stretch should be in the front delt, chest and biceps.  You should NOT feel pain with the shoulder joint.

Common Error(s):
Spotting:

Other Adaptive Push Exercises 1

The following exercises are experiential only.  They will not be used during your practical.  However, they can be used for programming as well as with clients in the future.  Take turns being the client and the trainer and try at least one set of each of the following adaptive core exercises:

1-Band Under Arms Modified Grip Chest Press

Questions to consider:  Secure around the wrist before placing in the palm of the hand.

Movement Pattern: Press | horizontal Target: Pec Major Synergist(s): Deltoids (Anterior), Triceps
Exercise
Regressions: Progressions:
Key Teaching Points

Either in standing or seated.  Wrap a theraband dog loop knot or tubing handle around the wrist and into the web of the palm of the and to ensure a secure grip for those that have issues gripping/grasping.  Follow instructions for band chest press.

Common Error(s):
Spotting: Band/Tubing Anchoring

2-Wrist Weight Shoulder Press

Questions to consider:  Who would this be for?  How would you ensure enough load?

Movement Pattern: Press | vertical Target: Deltoids (Anterior) Synergist(s): Triceps
Exercise
Regressions: Progressions:
Key Teaching Points
  1. At the start of each rep focus on squeezing your shoulder blades together
  2. Start across your upper chest below your chin,
  3.  With your chest up, push your hands directly to the sky
Common Error(s):
Spotting:

3-Band Triceps Extension

Questions to consider:  Who would you not prescribe this for?  Why not use a cable?  How would you manage Gripping Issues?

Movement Pattern: Single-joint | isolation Target: Triceps Synergist(s):
Exercise
Regressions: Progressions: Skullcrusher | Triceps Extension | Pushdown
Key Teaching Points
  1. Whilst keeping your elbows close to your stomach and shoulders pinned back, grip the bar with a pronated grip (palms facing downwards) shoulder width apart. Your feet should be positioned relatively close whilst your knees are allowed a slight bend also.
  2. Leaning slightly forwards, exhale your breath and push the bar down using only your triceps until the bar hits your hip/upper thigh region. At this point, the arms should be fully extended and there should be considerable stress or tension placed on the triceps muscle.
  3. Throughout the movement, your shoulders and arms should be still and the forearms should be the only muscle group moving.
Common Error(s): Inappropriate momentum | Not engaging core | Forward Head Posture
Spotting: Band/Tubing Anchoring

Review and practice the Plank, Push, and Pull exercises

Familiarize yourself with various PLANK, PUSH, and PULL instability exercises, experience the exercises, and recognize when you would coach these exercises (with whom and when in training).

Plank Exercises:

The plank protects the spine by bracing to maintain stability, and resist rotation.

General form and cue reminders:

  • neutral spine
  • level pelvis
  • alignment of the ears, shoulders, hips, knees, and ankles
  • all exercises are held with full body tension and controlled diaphragmatic breathing
  • when performing the plank focus on maintaining tension and stability in the core and enable mobility at the extremities when needed
Push Exercises:

General form and cue reminders:

  • focus on resisting flexion, extension, and rotation of torso and hips
  • keep the torso, hips, and lower body stability and aligned
  • maintaining tension and stability in the core
  • arms, chest, and shoulder girdle are driving the movement
  • all exercises are held with full body tension and controlled diaphragmatic breathing
Pull Exercises:

General form and cue reminders:

  • the core should be braced and the torso stable
  • maintain tension and stability in the core
  • the arms and shoulder girdle are mobile
  • initiate the pulling movements with a scapular-J or negative shrug
  • keep the shoulders depressed and retracted
  • all exercises are held with full body tension and controlled diaphragmatic breathing

After reviewing and practising these exercises, mark this task as complete, and move to the final task of completing a full (Plank, or Push, or Pull) competency.

Review and practice the general set-up of TRX

Review and practice the general TRX skills outlined below.

General rules for using TRX:

  1. keep core engaged
  2. maintain good posture
  3. keep straps tight
  4. no sawing strap
  5. move hands higher to prevent straps rubbing on arms.

General rules for making TRX exercises harder and easier:

  1. The steeper your body angle, the greater the resistance for the exercise (move feet toward anchor = more resistance = harder; move feet away from anchor = less resistance = easier)
  2. Decreasing your base of support challenges your ability to stabilize and requires more core engagement (stagger step is easier than wide straight stance; wide straight stance is easier than narrow straight stance; narrow straight stance is easier than one leg stance)
  3. For ground-based exercises (i.e., leg curls), moving body so feet are on far side of pendulum makes it easier, moving it so feet are on near side of pendulum makes it harder.
Setting up the TRX system:

 

 

 

  • The anchor point should be 7-10 feet (top of #1 on picture)
  • Equalizer loop point 6 feet (#6 on picture)
  • Yellow tab (change of colour) is mid-point on the straps (#8 on picture)
  • When straps are fully lengthened, the foot straps should be 3 inches off of the ground (#12 on picture)
Shortening the TRX Straps:

 

  • Hold one strap of the TRX, depress the cam buckle (#10) with your thumb and grasp the yellow adjustment tab (#9) with the other hand
  • Simultaneously draw backward on the buckle and push the adjustment tab up along the strap

Repeat on other side

 

 

 

Lengthening the TRX Straps:

 

 

  • Simultaneously depress both buckles (#10) and pull downward, away from anchor point
Setting up the Single Strap design:
  • Hold handle A on top of handle B
  • Pass handle B through the triangle-shaped webbing of hand A. Switch hands.
  • Repeat by passing hand A through the triangle-shaped webbing of handle B. Switch hands.
  • Pull handle A toward you to lock.

Helping the client get feet-in strap design for plank:
  • Lie on back with knees to chest.
  • Put straps around toes with the hard handle (#11) on the bottom of the feet.
  • Roll from your back to your front with knees to chest.
  • Your feet do not need to rotate in the straps because you want the hard handle to the bottom of your feet.

After reviewing and practising all of these skills, mark this task as complete, and move to the next task.

Other Adaptive Pulling Exercises

The following exercises are experiential only.  They will not be used during your practical.  However, they can be used for programming as well as with clients in the future.  Take turns being the client and the trainer and try at least one set of each of the following adaptive core exercises:

1-Band or Cable Single Arm Row

Questions to consider:  In what situation would you want to consider training one side at a time?

Movement Pattern: Pull | horizontal Target: Latissimus Dorsi Synergist(s): Rhomboids
Exercise
Regressions: Progressions:
Key Teaching Points

Same set up as cable row with extra emphasis on engaging intrinsic core to prevent trunk rotation as well as focusing on scapular retraction, especially of the arm that has no load.

Common Error(s): Not engaging core | Rounded shoulders
Spotting: Cables

2-Band Under Feet Bent Row

Questions to consider:  How do you safely secure the band under foot?  Should you cross the band?

Movement Pattern: Pull | horizontal Target: Latissimus Dorsi Synergist(s): Biceps, Brachialis, Rhomboids
Exercise
Regressions: Progressions: Bent-Over Row | Inverted Row
Key Teaching Points

Feet shoulder width apart.
Band tubing secured under medial arch of foot. Even pressure under feet to ensure band is secure.
Cross band technique for additional security.
Hinge at hips, slight bend in knees, keep spine neutral including maintaining a flat back, slight lumbar curve and neutral (not forward) head position.
Initiate row by retracting scapulae as you bring arms back.

Common Error(s): Rounded shoulders | Rounded lower back | Forward Head Posture
Spotting: Band/Tubing Anchoring

3-Wrist Weight Bent Row

Questions to consider:  Who would you not prescribe this for?

Movement Pattern: Pull | horizontal Target: Latissimus Dorsi Synergist(s): Rhomboids, Trapezius
Exercise
Regressions: Progressions:
Key Teaching Points

This exercise is for clients with gripping and/or grasping challenges.  Client can either lay supine on bench or stand in a bent over position (similar to a bent over row).  Make sure to complete row with proper scapular retraction.  Consider supporting head with towel under forehead for comfort.

Common Error(s):
Spotting:

4-Band Reverse Fly

Questions to consider:  Could you use a fixed loop band?

Movement Pattern: Pull | horizontal Target: Deltoid (Posterior) Synergist(s): Rhomboids
Exercise
Regressions: Progressions:
Key Teaching Points

Create a dog loop with theraband.  Secure for clients with gripping/grasping weakness by placing loop around wrist and wrapping a few extra times.  Once band is secure proceed with Band reverse fly technique.

Common Error(s):
Spotting: Band/Tubing Anchoring

5-Band Under Feet Biceps Curl

Questions to consider:  How are you safely securing the band?

Movement Pattern: Single-joint | isolation Target: Biceps Synergist(s):
Exercise
Regressions: Progressions: Biceps Curl | Concentration Curl
Key Teaching Points

Feet shoulder width apart. Band under arch/groove of foot. Even foot pressure to keep band secure. Upright strong and neutral posture. Palms up. Hands at side in comfortable position. Elbows tight to trunk. Engage upward motion with biceps contraction through full range.

Common Error(s): Rounded shoulders | Inappropriate momentum
Spotting: Band/Tubing Anchoring